Going Forward From Here

Going forward from here, no matter where your "here" is, can be an act of love or an act of fear. 

If it is an act of love, you share your power with life in a way that empowers you simultaneously. If it is an act of fear, you give your power away to that which you fear, never quite knowing when, how or where it will return to you. 

Even power given away returns to you at some point. It might be during a healing session, or during a particularly courageous moment of interrupting an old pattern. For many, taking power back doesn't happen until the moments before death or not for many lifetimes to come. Power given away is not power lost, it's just delayed, lent out for others to use as they see fit. 

Those who accept the power of others are also enacting fear. They have forgotten their own power, or where they had given their power away as well. Even teachers of empowerment who sit on pedestals act from a fear that an absence of followers might reveal the perceived holes in their power. So much of humanity deals in a currency of power from to remedy the sense of powerlessness, to somehow regain power given away to fear. It is a direct metaphor for a global economic system that functions in the exchange of debt. 

One country thinks it needs something it doesn't have, so it exchanges debt for goods. It gives its power to another rather than use resources available locally. Humans acting on the old system think they need what other humans have, so they trade debt for what they don't have. It's trading absence for absence - the particular commodities change with desire. 

Those who are conductors of debt often wield power over others, perpetuating the exchange of fear in the form of goods and services sold as inarguable necessities...like cable television, insurance and warheads. Almost nobody notices. 

For a moment, let's not judge fear. Let's not say fear is bad, let's not even say we shouldn't feel fear. For a moment, let's feel fear. Just feel fear and do nothing for it or against it. Feel fear and look at the products sold as necessities. Feel fear and see how the system functions. Feel fear and see the truth. Feel fear and notice that you are still breathing. Feel fear and notice that you are still alive. Feel fear and notice that you don't have to have the answers. Feel fear and notice that you are not responsible for the conductors of fear. Feel fear and notice how it feels to breathe. Feel. Feel and notice whether you still feel fear...or if you are starting to feel your body. 

Notice the life moving through your body. 

Fear is a sensation often misunderstood to be powerful. Compelling as it is, when fear is recognized and addressed as a sensation generated by thoughts and judgments, it can dissolve in the purity of awareness. 

Fear doesn't like this conversation. Its ally is need. Without fear driving the perception of need, power over others cannot survive. Fear thinks this conversation is naive. Ridiculous. 

Going forward from here, seeing fear is an act of love. Feeling fear so that it dissolves is a courageous action that opens space for love. See fear as fear without lending your action to its desires. Love is action that is not of fear. It's that simple. 

Awareness is an act of love even before the movement of a single muscle. Your awareness creates movement, and awareness without judgment generates movement toward greater love. Be aware of love, and you will be aware of fear without giving it power.

Be aware of awareness. Awareness is your ally, your birthright, your gift to the world. Like a flashlight, awareness helps you see where you are going. Give your awareness to love and your action can empower love. Give your awareness to fear and fear will wield power over you. Fear does not want you to see this simplicity. It prefers you to fear. 

Fear will say, "This is hard..." It's not, really. It's just unfamiliar. 

Going forward from here, enjoy the ride! It's exciting, which can feel a lot like fear. Feel excited! Feel and breathe. Feel your awareness. Feel love. 

 

 

 

Kerri LakeComment